The Charnel House (2016) Review

2.5/5

Skulls

Directed by Craig Moss Written by Emanuel Isler, Chad Israel
Starring Joe Keery, Nadine Velazquez, Callum Blue

90 mins - Thriller - Release date: 4 November 2016

Who doesn’t love a good haunting story? And that’s exactly what director Craig Moss’ The Charnel House is, an entertaining ghost story with an expected call for justice. But you can’t expect much less when a former slaughterhouse that was used as a front for killing people gets converted into condo real estate.

While The Charnel House hits the beats that it should and it’s entertaining enough, it’s clear that there were budget restrictions confining its scope and limiting a grander story. Thankfully, the casting was good and the acting and chemistry between actors was natural and fluid.

As alluded to earlier, The Charnel House tells the story of Alex Reaves (Callum Blue), a real estate entrepreneur, his wife, Charlotte Reaves (Nadine Velazquez), and their daughter, Mia (Makenzie Moss), as they open up high-tech condos in a former slaughterhouse. Well, what kind of ghost story would this be if there wasn’t some haunting going on here?

As the film progresses, strange occurrences escalate and personalities change… and that sounds an awful lot like The Amityville Horror, and many other movies that have come after it.

The Verdict:

No, The Charnel House isn’t wholly original, but not much is these days. Nonetheless, there’s a decent story carried by a good cast here. There are other movies that I’d recommend first to non-fans of the genre, but if you consume everything that is similar to this, then this will probably be better than most.

Oh, and for the record, I still don’t why they didn’t title this move The Fremont Lofts.

Rock Hard \m/

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Have Your Say Leave A Comment

  • Noel

    Oh come on, Dude… u hit an all time low when you pick on children. Stick to being constructive about story, character development and structure or have you not been educated about that? You honestly start to second guess who these people are reviewing movies these days.

    • Point received. It wasn’t meant to read as picking on the girl, more to say that it became distracting. In either case, the statement has been removed.